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Genre: Expository
Subject: Language Arts, Technology, Social Studies
Age Group: Middle Grades and High School
Topics: futurism, technology, inventions
Idea Explanation:
Initially, students get into the ideas of flying cars and cities in the sky. However, when we discuss social and economic trends and policies, certain inventions seem less likely (think of the shrapnel from a flying car, for example). This helps students think about the nature of humanity and the nature of technology at the same time. Ultimately, they’re left asking, “Will things really feel all that different?”
Language Explanation:
The vocabulary here is not all that difficult, but the verb tense (future perfect with passive voice) can be challenging for English Language Learners. Many struggle to see how “will have been” takes place in the future while talking about what has already been done. It is essentially telling students, “These are things that have not been invented but will already be invented by the time we reach 2058.” A quick verb tense study might be helpful:
Subject (a noun in the form of a direct object) + will + have + been + past participle (past tense of a verb) + predicate. 
Flying cars will have been invented by 2058. 
Sometimes it helps to show students the active voice version of the past perfect tense as they write an answer:
Subject (noun or pronoun) + will + have + past participle (past tense of a verb) + predicate. 
Car manufacturers will have developed solar-fueled cars. 

Genre: Expository

Subject: Language Arts, Technology, Social Studies

Age Group: Middle Grades and High School

Topics: futurism, technology, inventions

Idea Explanation:

Initially, students get into the ideas of flying cars and cities in the sky. However, when we discuss social and economic trends and policies, certain inventions seem less likely (think of the shrapnel from a flying car, for example). This helps students think about the nature of humanity and the nature of technology at the same time. Ultimately, they’re left asking, “Will things really feel all that different?”

Language Explanation:

The vocabulary here is not all that difficult, but the verb tense (future perfect with passive voice) can be challenging for English Language Learners. Many struggle to see how “will have been” takes place in the future while talking about what has already been done. It is essentially telling students, “These are things that have not been invented but will already be invented by the time we reach 2058.” A quick verb tense study might be helpful:

Subject (a noun in the form of a direct object) + will + have + been + past participle (past tense of a verb) + predicate. 

Flying cars will have been invented by 2058. 

Sometimes it helps to show students the active voice version of the past perfect tense as they write an answer:

Subject (noun or pronoun) + will + have + past participle (past tense of a verb) + predicate. 

Car manufacturers will have developed solar-fueled cars. 

Sometimes a student comes up with a better example. This was one of those times. 

Sometimes a student comes up with a better example. This was one of those times. 

I always use this in the first week of school. 

I always use this in the first week of school. 

I use this as a get-to-know-you activity in my class. 

I use this as a get-to-know-you activity in my class.